Is there a requirement for the manufacturers of trailers to rate the tracks that winches are mounted on?
NO, there is currently no requirement to rate and mark the strength of anchor points.

What are the requirements for securing devices marked with Working Load Limit?
Securing Devices Marked With Working Load Limit (Part 11 of NSC Standard 10)

11(1) The working load limit of a tiedown or a component of a tiedown that is marked by its manufacturer with a numeric working load limit is the marked working load limit.

(2) A tiedown or a component of a tiedown that is marked by its manufacturer in accordance with a standard referred to in Part 4 has a working load limit equal to that standard.

(3) A chain that is marked by the manufacturer in accordance with the table of Working Load Limits under Part 4 – Section 7 has a working load limit equal to the amount shown for the grade and size.

(4) A person shall not use a tiedown or a component of a tiedown to secure cargo to a vehicle unless it is marked by the manufacturer with respect to its working load limit.

If a tiedown is made up of a strap, winch and chain, do all three pieces require a rating?
If the manufacturer has provided a Working Load Limit for the complete tiedown assembly, it is not necessary to provide strength ratings for individual components which are permanent parts of the assembly.

Some ratings on winches are on the inside, if all three pieces are required to be rated, will inspectors require the tiedown to be taken off the load to see the rating on the winches?
Not for winches that serve as anchor points and are attached to the trailer, or where a strength rating is provided for the complete tiedown assembly.

Do winch straps or ratchet straps require both a tag and stencil with a WLL on each of them
NO, the marking can be on a tag and / or stenciled to the webbing, but both are not required.

Do Chains require a supplementary tag stating its WLL?
NO, this is not required legally anywhere in North America.

What information is required for marking the WLL of tiedown assemblies (eg name of manufacturer, date etc)?
A tiedown or a component of a tiedown should be marked in accordance with the appropriate standard referred to in Part 4 of NSC Standard 10.

Do the marking need to be a numeric marking or will a manufacture code be sufficient?
Marking of Working Load Limit should be in accordance with the provisions of the appropriate standard referred to in Part 4 of NSC Standard 10.

Can ratings only be provided by manufacturers?
YES, recognizing that a manufacturer would include individuals or companies that assemble tiedowns using components fabricated and sold by others.

What are the requirements for establishing the strength rating of a tiedown?
The Working Load Limit of a tiedown or a component of a tiedown should be established in accordance with the appropriate standard referred to in Part 4 of NSC Standard 10.

Do bungee cords need to be rated and marked with a WLL?
Bungee cords and tarp straps are not suitable for use as tiedowns and are equally unsuited to having an assigned Working Load Limit. There is no intention to prohibit the use of these devices as supplementary restraint for light weight cargo and equipment.

What are the requirements for rating and marking the strength of rope tiedowns?
A rope tiedown should be rated and marked in accordance with the appropriate standard referred to in Part 4 of NSC Standard 10.

Are knots permitted in ropes used as tiedowns?
A rope tiedown should be used in accordance with the provisions of the appropriate standard referred to in Part 4 of NSC Standard 10, including any restrictions on the use, or presence, of knots.

Do devices used in conjunction with a securing device to prevent a tiedown from becoming loose,
unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit require a WLL marking (eg. metal rod on load binder).

NO

Is there a durability requirement for marking by the manufacturer with respect to its working load limit?
NO, but the absence of a legible marking from the manufacturer indicating the strength of a tiedown will cause it to be assigned a default WLL of zero.

Reference: Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), or CVSA.